Inkitt for Android Launches (launched) Today!

It’s been one of those days, this is going up about 10 hours after I meant it to. Such is life in the middle of the worst winter storms in my area since the 80’s. Sorry, Inkitt.

A couple of months back, I talked about an iOS App for Inkitt — well, today, they launched the Android version. Who’s Inkitt, you ask?

On the surface, Inkitt (www.inkitt.com) is a platform where aspiring writers can share their novels and inquisitive readers can unearth fresh content. But under the hood, we are democratizing publishing: The Inkitt algorithm analyzes reading behavior to predict future bestsellers. In other words: if readers love it, Inkitt publishes it.

It looks like the iOS App was pretty well received ( featured on the US App Store but also on numerous other App Stores around the world, as well as on the front page of Product Hunt, ranking in the top 10 in Tech).

“It was a great reward to see Inkitt featured as a top app in numerous App Stores around the world and receive such great feedback from users” says Inkitt’s Founder and CEO, Ali Albazaz. “Readers were really excited about the iOS app but kept asking when we’re launching on Android too. We heard them, worked really hard and today we’re bringing Inkitt to Android devices. All readers will now be able to discover tomorrow’s bestsellers on the go and read great novels by upcoming authors wherever they are.”

Inkitt for Android – 4 key features:

  • Access to thousands of novels from all fiction genres: fantasy, sci-fi, mystery, thriller, horror, romance, drama, action, adventure, YA and more
  • Personalized reading suggestions: hand-picked novels based on a reader’s favorite fiction genres
  • Customizable look to match user preferences (e.g. font size, color combinations)
  • Online/Offline: readers can save novels to their offline library to access them anytime

Beyond being a platform connecting aspiring authors with book lovers, Inkitt’s mission is to become the world’s fairest publishing house: Its in-house developed algorithm analyzes reading behavior to determine the potential of a novel to become the next bestseller. Using this unique data-driven approach, Inkitt wants to ensure that great works by new and talented writers never again stay in the dark.

Here’s some screen shots:
Phone App

Tablet App

Check out some more details about the app back on my post about the iOS version.

So far, I’ve really enjoyed my interactions with the folks at Inkitt and what I’ve read from them — give it a shot. I’m downloading the App as soon as I hit “Publish.” Once again, the link for the Android app is: https://inkitt.app.link/androidglobal.

Some of this material was taken from Inkitt’s Press Release provided to me by the company. I assume they don’t mind, since they put it better than I could.

Mostly Human Giveaway

I really don’t know much about the book Mostly Human by D.I. Jolly — it’ll either be the last book I read of 2016 or the first of 2017. But it looks appealing — and the author seems like a nice guy. So I was glad to chip in when he asked if I’d help spread the word about a Goodreads Giveaway for some physical copies of the book.

Mostly HumanAlex Harris is a world famous rock star, lead singer of the Internationally acclaimed band The Waterdogs. But Alex is no ordinary rocker, and has a secret that he and his family have painstakingly kept since he was ten years old.

While playing on his grandparents farm, Alex discovers what he presumes is a dead wolf. With a slip of the hand he realises it’s not as dead as he thought, and come the first full moon, everyone realises it wasn’t just a wolf.

What would you do if your son could never be normal again?

There ya go: Rockers, Werewolves, British spelling, and (according to another description I read) Organised Crime — sounds like a quiet weekend for Ozzy Osbourne or the makings of a fun book. I can’t help you enjoy the former, but if you click this link, maybe I can help you enjoy the latter.

Introducing Inkitt’s iOS app

A couple of months ago, I was emailed by someone from a publishing company called Inkitt — never heard of them before, but the book they gave me was pretty cool, and I made a note to keep my eye out for more by them. They describe themselves as:

a platform where budding writers can share their novels and inquisitive readers can unearth fresh content. But under the hood, we are democratizing publishing: Inkitt is built on an algorithm which analyzes reading patterns to predict future bestsellers. Using this unique data- and readers-driven approach to uncover highly addictive stories, Inkitt’s goal is to remove the middle person so that a blockbuster book is never rejected by a publishing house again. In other words, if readers love it, Inkitt publishes it.

I kinda dig the idea — I’m not sure it’ll give us the highest quality books, but it should give us some entertaining reads.

Their next step? Launching an app — today, I should stress — for iPhones, iPads, etc. (the Android version is coming soon, I’m assured, so I can use it). Check out this video…

Introducing Inkitt for iOS: Read great novels by up-and-coming authors on your iPhone and iPad from Inkitt – The Hipster’s Library on Vimeo.

In less than 2 years, Inkitt has attracted over 700,000 unique readers: the iOS app will give book lovers and publishers greater access to Inkitt’s digital library of over 80,000 stories by up-and-coming authors.

“As more people read digitally we want to make it easier and faster for people to access great literature wherever they are, whether on the go or relaxing at home,” says Inkitt’s Founder and CEO, Ali Albazaz. “Inkitt’s iOS app will better enable emerging authors to share their work with test readership groups and give readers globally the opportunity to turn the page on one of the world’s next best sellers.”

Key features include:

  • Access to 80,000 stories in every genre: fantasy, sci-fi, romance, thriller, horror, adventure, action and more
  • Personalized suggestions: hand-picked novels based on reader’s preferences
  • App customization according to user preferences (e.g. font size, colors)
  • Online/Offline: readers can save novels to their offline library to access them without an internet connection

It looks like a pretty cool app — I will be grabbing the Android version ASAP (and probably mentioning it here). Give it a go.

Oh, before I forget, here’s some screenshote of the app. But first, one more time, here’s the download link: https://inkitt.app.link/reading-app-iphone-ipad


(parts of this post were cannibalized from a press release from Inkitt — hope they don’t mind too much, but they said it better than I could paraphrase)

The Shadow Bearers on Inkshares

Friend of the blog, Jayme Beddingfield, and her co-writer, Rebecca Clark have a neat looking novel they’re trying to get published. The Shadow Bearers — an expansion of a short-story they co-wrote — is up for funding on Inkshares.

Countless Huditra villages demolished by a darkness spreading throughout the lands. Thousands slain by the falling shadows. Hate looms over the forgotten lands like heavy fog stifling the little life that’s left. Over the years the Nafarat have been casting their magic, destroying all that’s natural. The War From Nowhere forced those who’ve survived the initial attacks into hiding. Nothing alive was safe. Both Tag, the leader of the Nari, river, people and Athea, the future chief of Dagee, the tribe behind the mountains, are all that’s left standing of their kind. With their home grounds no longer safe Tag and Athea hit the traveler’s road, each with individual missions. When their paths cross, they reluctantly team up to seek the answers that will lead them to free the land of shadows.

Once they hit the magic number of 750 preorders, Inkshares will publish and distribute the novel — and if that’s not enough, they’re competing in the Inkshares/Geek & Sundry Fantasy Contest — which just puts the whole Inkshares thing into overdrive. Follow the project over on Inkshares to help them in the contest, and if you can spare a dime, preorder the novel. I bet you’ll (we’ll, actually) be glad you did.

The Summer that Melted Everything is Hot!

(sorry, that was just horrible, but I couldn’t stop myself)

So, last month I posted about Tiffany McDaniel‘s debut, The Summer That Melted Everything and even did a Q&A with her. She was recently featured on the longlist of contenders for The Guardian’s Not-the-Booker prize — and was among some really august company.

Well, Monday they released the list of 6 finalists, and McDaniel was among them (and many of the august company, like DeLillo, were not). This is really great to see and I’d like to congratulate her, and hope she does well here (go vote!).

Help The Once and Future Podcast

Family stuff is keeping me from getting anything done here today. The timing works out well because this week, Anton Strout’s podcast had a brief episode that I’d like to talk about.

I don’t know if you guys are listening to this podcast or not — I’ve talked about it more than a few times. If you don’t, you should — Strout (author of the Simon Canderous novels and the Spellmason series) talks to authors, game designers, publishers, artists, etc. — creative people in geeky fields about their work. I’ve found several favorite authors thanks to these episodes.

It’s a lot of fun, pretty informative — and it could use some financial help. Spend 10 minutes listening to Strout talk about how you can help and what his plans for the podcast are. Then go diving through the archives.

The Most Feared Books of All Time

It almost seems as though any book that gets famous enough is going to earn some complaints and criticism. These usually come from parents looking to protect their children from topics and material they deem unfit for consumption. When a complaint is formally submitted with the intent to remove reading material from a library or required reading list, it is known as a challenge. A successful challenge results in a ban.

Although it may seem like a positive thing from the outside, challenges are usually met with much resistance from educators and faculty member. The team at Readers.com researched and illustrated a timeline of some of the most feared and banned books in history and tracked why people wanted to get these works banned in the first place. Check out the graphic to see the entire list! How many of your favorite books actually made it on that list?

The Most Feared Books of All Time

(thanks to Bryan from Readers.com for asking me to post this and for writing the intro)