GUEST POST: GenTech in the Workplace: A Fresh Perspective Employing Generations

GenTech in the Workplace: A Fresh Perspective Employing Generations

by Guest Blogger Dr. Rick Chromey

The Millennial is creative but lazy and entitled. The Gen Xer is hardworking but rude and disloyal. The Boomer is reliable but old and out of touch. It’s a generational cocktail that produces derision and indecision, doubt and depression.

So, let’s say you’re a 35-year old and you lead a diverse team of three different ages. You have a worker who’s 18, another is 56 and yet one more aged 65. Traditionally, you view them as Gen Z, Gen X, and Boomer, but you could also see them from a different perspective.

Recast them through their generational technologies, to bring out the best performance.

Let me show you how.

The 18-year old

The 18-year old was born in 2001. She’s part of the Net (1990-2010) and iTech (2000-2020) generations. She’s been coming of age since 2011 and will reach full adult maturity in 2026. She’s known only a digital, cyberculture. The internet is like electricity. Her first technology was the smartphone and the iPad. She’s been baptized in social media. As a young employee, she is fluid in digital media, embraces diversity and is constantly connected. She doesn’t do email nor Facebook but enjoys Snapchat and Instagram. She wants to be a YouTube entrepreneur. The Gen Zer likes long breaks and often calls in sick.

The 56-year old

The 56-year old was born in 1963. He’s part of the Space (1950-1970) and Gamer (1960-1980) generations. He came of age between 1973 and 1988. His whole life has been like a video game and a rocket ride. He’s seen revolutions and recessions, a man landing on the moon and a teacher dying at takeoff. He remembers Nixon’s resignation, Reagan’s near assassination and Clinton’s impeachment. He grew up on rabbit ears, snowy channels, and black and white television. Consequently, he’s a bit jaded. He’s a realist. He struggles with newer tech. He still prefers old-school letters but has fully embraced email. He got hit hard by the Big Recession and has little saved for retirement. He’s working for every last penny. The Gen Xer has had five jobs in twenty years.

The 65-year old

The 65-year old was born in 1954. She’s part of the Television (1940-1960) and Space (1950-1960) generations. She came of age between 1964 and 1979. She watched JFK’s assassination, the Beatles and Walter Cronkite on television. She had an 8-Track in her car and a stack of records on her bedroom floor. She’s an idealist with a bit of hippie in her. She doesn’t mind the tech but thinks it’s over-rated. She prefers to talk face-to-face. She’s worked for the company for thirty years. She’s Ms. Reliable and she struggles with the team at times.

You – the 35-year old

And then there’s you. You were born in 1984. You’re part of the Cable Television (1970-1990) and Personal Computer-Cell Phone (1980-2000) generations. You came of age between 1994 and 2009. You grew up in a modem, flip phone, desktop culture. You watched the 9-11 terrorist attacks on CNN and suckled on an MTV cribs reality culture. You are computer literate and tech-savvy. You’re confident, verbal and view the world differently than older workers. You don’t mind email but prefer texts.

Your team is a reflection of their “coming of age” technology. One travels life (and work) like a video game while another freely swims in social media. One prefers texts and another wants face-to-face. One is company-loyal and another works to play.

Now you have a good picture of who’s on your team. How will you now delegate workflow? What will change?

The people working for you are the products of their generation’s technology.

 

We are giving away GenTech for free for one hour on AMAZON

GenTech is having a best-seller party, Thursday, March 26, 2020, 7-8pm EST and the book will be free for 1-hour on Amazon. Join us, and please share!

Want to learn more about GenTech? Go to http://www.mygentech.us, and we are on Facebook: @authorrichchromey, Twitter: @MyGenTech2020, and Instagram @MyGenTech. You can reach Dr. Rick Chromey at rick@rickchromey.com.

BOOK SPOTLIGHT: GenTech: An American Story of Technology, Change and Who We Really Are by Dr. Rick Chromey

Welcome to the Irresponsible Reader’s tour stop for Dr. Rick Chromey’s GenTech: An American Story of Technology, Change and Who We Really Are! In addition to this Book Spotlight, I’ve got a Guest Post from the author coming up in a bit, too. Give this book a second-look folks, maybe more. There’s a giveaway at the end of this post (and information on how to get a free copy in the Guest Post, too!)—be sure you check them out!

We are uniquely shaped by innovations that influenced us during our “coming of age” years between 10 and 25.
It is the technological interactions in our adolescence and college
years that guide our generational frames more than anything else, not the day we were born.We are generations of technology. We are GenTech.
– Dr. Rick Chromey
Join us for this tour from Mar 23 to Apr 3, 2020!

Book Details:

Book Title:  GenTech: An American Story of Technology, Change and Who We Really Are by Dr. Rick Chromey
Category:  Adult Non-fiction 18 yrs +,  328 pages
Genre:  History / Cultural & Technical History
Publisher:  Morgan James Publishing
Release date:   May 26, 2020
Tour dates: Mar 23 to Apr 3, 2020
Content Rating:  G : This is a non-fiction book about our technical history and how it has shaped our culture.

Book Description:

Every twenty years a new generation rises, but who and what defines
these generations? And could current generational tags mislead and miss
the point? In this insightful analysis of technology history since 1900,
Dr. Rick Chromey offers a fresh perspective for understanding what
makes a generation tick and differ from others. Within GenTech,
readers learn how every generation uniquely interacts with particular
technologies that define historical temperament and personality and why
current generational labels are more fluid than fixed, and more loopy
than linear. Consequently, three major generational constellations
emerge, each containing four, twenty-year generations that overlap,
merge, and blend:

 

  • The Audio Generations (1900-1950):
    Transportation-Telephone Generation (1900-1920), Motion Picture
    Generation (1910-1930), Radio Generation (1920-1940), Vinyl Record
    Generation (1930-1950)
  • The Visual Generations (1940-1990): Television
    Generation (1940-1960), Space Generation (1950-1970), Gamer Generation
    (1960-1980) and Cable Television Generation (1970-1990)
  • The Digital Generations (1980-2000): Personal
    Computer-Cell Phone Generation (1980-2000), Net Generation (1990-2010),
    iTech Generation (2000-2020), and Robotics Generation (2010-2030). Dive
    in and revel in this exciting, compelling, and novel perspective to
    understanding recent American generations with GenTech.

 

Official Scheduled Release Date is May 26, 2020.
Pre-Order Now:
Amazon.com ~ Barnes & Noble ~ IndieBound
BAM ~ Powell‘s ~ Indigo ~ Rediscovered Books

 

Meet the Author:  

Rick Chromey is a cultural explorer, social historian and generational
futurist. He’s also served as a pastor, professor, speaker/trainer, and
consultant. In 2017, he founded MANNA! Educational Services
International to inspire and equip leaders, teachers, pastors, and
parents. Rick has a doctorate in leadership and the emerging culture;
and travels the U.S. and world to speak on culture, faith, history,
education, and leadership topics. He has authored over a dozen books on
leadership, natural motivation, creative communication, and classroom
management. He lives with his wife, Linda, in Meridian, Idaho.
Connect with the Author: website ~ youtube ~ facebook ~ twitter ~ instagram

Enter the Giveaway:

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GUEST POST: The Poop Diaries: How a clogged toilet turned into a book by Abby Ross

The Poop Diaries

How a clogged toilet turned into a book

I never expected to write a book. Of course, I have always loved to write. When I was a child, I wrote poems, short stories, and filled in the pages of those blank books designed for kids to put their imagination into words. Writing has served me well throughout my career. I worked as a television news reporter for six years where every day I wrote stories. I then transitioned into public relations where I wrote bylines, press releases and pitches. Today, I work in marketing where I write blog posts, client-facing and sales enablement content, and website pages. Writing is and has always been my favorite part of every job. Again, however, I never expected to write a book.

“The Poop Diaries” started as a side project. My toilet clogged on a Wednesday evening. I could not sleep without a working toilet, so I called a plumber – Jon. He showed up within an hour and unclogged the toilet almost immediately (as I embarrassingly cowered outside the bathroom door, like many people do). Jon also suggested I buy a new toilet, which he had in his truck ready to go. An hour later, the new toilet was installed, yet Jon did not seem to want to leave. He was a really nice guy who had that kind of magnetic personality where you hung on his words, curious what he would say next. I asked him to share his “greatest hit” stories, those service calls that he would always remember.

The minute he started sharing them, I began laughing and could not stop. I had no idea plumbers dealt with so much crap! And I do not mean literal crap. I mean the people they meet, things they find, and experiences they encounter. At that moment, I knew I had to write a book about Jon. After interviewing him and writing his diaries, I knew I had landed on something unique. So, I searched for more plumbers across North America.

The toughest part about the interviewing process was finding plumbers who would speak to me. As I mentioned earlier, I am a published writer in the sense of blogging and ghost-writing articles, but I am a “no name” in the book world. How were the plumbers supposed to know I was not a scammer? I found most of the plumbers through friends. Everywhere I went I told people I was writing a book about plumbers. I could not believe how many people in my inner circle knew a plumber! And I do not just mean a plumber who worked for them at one point in time. My friend’s uncle is a plumber. My other friend’s brother-in-law is a plumber. My friend’s friend is a plumber. Suddenly, plumbers were popping up everywhere.

Two of my biggest “finds” were women plumbers. Plumbing is still very much a man’s world. Women, however, are increasingly working in the business. The two women I interviewed own their own plumbing companies. My husband found them online, and fortunately, both agreed to talk to me. While I love the men’s stories in the book, the women’s stories are their own breed. For example, one of the women accidentally broke up a marriage because of what she found while on the job.

Writing this book made me come to a few realizations:

  1. Plumbers know so much about us, yet we know so little about them. They see us in our most private moments, sometimes because for whatever reason, we do not feel the need to “clear the cabinets” when a plumber comes over. Or, like one case in the book – get out of the shower. This book shows you those personal moments from the eyes of the plumber. It will definitely make you think twice about your trade worker etiquette.
  2. The stereotypes about plumbers – that they are blue-collar workers, who cannot pull up their pants, and are not educated – are FALSE. Plumbers are engineers. They spend years in school and/or working as an apprentice to learn the trade, which entails so much more than unclogging toilets. As one of the plumbers I interviewed stated, “Plumbing is like playing with a Tinkertoy set every day.” Plumbers also make good money. Many of the plumbers I interviewed have second homes and boats. No matter the state of the economy, the world will always need plumbers. It is a steady career that provides the opportunity to live well. Plumbers are also insanely patient and open-minded. Some of the stories they shared would make me want to run in the other direction. They all, however, stayed put, making sure they got the job done correctly, no matter how awkward the encounter. They also never made the customer feel embarrassed. All of the plumbers I interviewed said they are very careful with their reactions to situations because they never want a customer feeling uncomfortable. Oh, and that plumber’s crack stereotype? Most plumbers wear one-piece jumpers.
  3. Finally, I actually can write a book! All it took was finding a good story idea, and then dedicating the time to research, write and pitch (I pitched more than 100 publishers and agents. One said yes – Black Rose Writing). I believed in the idea from day one, and through the many rejections, I persisted. I knew if I could find just one person who believed in my idea as much as me, I would succeed. Persistence is the key to achieving an unexpected dream.

I hope you will enjoy reading “The Poop Diaries” as much as I enjoyed writing it. You can purchase it on Amazon.com and on BarnesandNoble.com

PUB DAY BOOK SPOTLIGHT: The Poop Diaries by Abby Ross

I didn’t have enough time to read The Poop Diaries by Abby Ross this month, but I liked the idea enough that I was hoping to give it a little boost here on its publication day. So I’ve got this little spotlight post and a nice guest post from the author coming along in a bit. But let’s start by learning a little about this atypical book, okay?

Book Details:

Book Title: The Poop Diaries by Abby Ross
Publisher: Black Rose Writing
Release date: February 6, 2020
Format: Ebook/Paperback
Length: 236 pages

Book Blurb:

They come into our homes. They see us in our most fragile moments. Plumbers are a fixture in our lives. When a toilet clogs, a faucet leaks, or a sewer line plugs, we call those unsung heroes, desperately seeking help. They scoop out our poop and pull underwear, toothbrushes and cotton balls out of our toilets, doing whatever it takes to get the job done.

On a late Wednesday evening, after my toilet clogged, I asked our plumber to share his top five “greatest hits.” The stories were so hilarious, I had to share them with the world. The Poop Diaries features true stories told by my plumber, and many other plumbers, about the most memorable service jobs they have worked on and most unique people they have helped. Whether it’s nudity, rats, fake vaginas, dildos, snakes, weapons and so much more, these plumbers have seen and smelled it all.

About the Author:

Abby Ross has nearly two decades of experience working in journalism, public relations, and marketing. She has written countless news stories, bylines, and blog posts. Abby began her career as a television news reporter, which fostered her passion for interviewing and writing about interesting people from all walks of life. After six years of reporting, Abby pivoted her career into public relations and marketing, which has been her focus for the past decade.

Purchase Links:

Amazon ~ Barnes & Noble

The White Man’s Guide to White Male Writers of the Western Canon by Dana Schwartz, Jason Adam Katzenstein (Illustrator): A Guide to White Male Writers for White Male Writers (or those who want to be one)

The White Man's Guide to White Male Writers of the Western Canon

The White Man’s Guide to White Male Writers of the Western Canon

by Dana Schwartz, Jason Adam Katzenstein (Illustrator)

Paperback, 241 pg.
Harper Perennial, 2019

Read: January 7-30, 2020
Grab a copy from your local indie bookstore (I did)!

If you want to be a writer, you should attend an Ivy League university, where you roommate happens to be the nephew of a senior editor at Knopf, and you should go on to get a summer internship in New York City. This internship will not be paid, and unfortunately you will have to suffer the indignity of living in an apartment that your parents pay for. But soon, your struggles will pay off, and you will be accepted at one of the nation’s most prestigious MFA programs.

If you can’t do all of that, I hate to say it, but it sounds like you won’t have the commitment and discipline necessary to make it as a writer.

Nice guy, the narrator of this book, right? I didn’t know this when I picked it up, but this is a book inspired by a parody Twitter account Schwartz runs @GuyInYourMFA, I wish I knew that going in—it might have helped me appreciate the book more. Probably not, really, the book speaks for itself, but it the humor in it screams Twitter. Anyway, that account is the voice behind this book.

This is a guide to:

teach you everything you need to know to become the chain-smokin, coffee-drinking, Proust-quoting, award-winning writer you’ve always known you should be…

Not a white man? Not to worry. The White Male Writer isn’t a hard-and-fast demographic; it’s a state of mind…

There’s a brief discussion of topics like how to dress like a writer, what the Western Canon is, how to identify “Chick Lit” (the last identifier is “By Jennifer Weiner”, which is a pretty good clue, you have to admit), and ends with a nice reading list of White Male Writers.

The heart of the book consists of thirty-two 6(+/-) page profiles of the greatest White Male Writers that make up the Western Canon. These consist of a brief biography, a discussion of some major works (“Works You Need to Know”), and some lessons from the work or life of the Writer that should be applied by the reader in their effort to become a Writer (drink recipes, how to respond to a rejection letter, how to write a love letter like James Joyce, etc.).

The writers are male, white, and largely published in the Twentieth Century (Shakespeare, Milton, Samuel Johnson, Goethe, Lord Byron, Dickens, Thoreau, and Tolstoy would be the exceptions). I can virtually guarantee that you’ve heard to them all—not that you’ve read them all, however. And in between the snark and intentionally sexist lessons, there’s some decent information to be gleaned. That isn’t the point of the book, the point is the snark, sexism, and general parodying the idea of the young, pretentious, white male would-be literary genius.

Every chapter includes at least 3 lines that should bring some level of amusement to the reader (some will have many more)—which is a pretty decent and consistent number. Sadly, all the jokes are around a theme, and so can get repetitive. If you don’t read cover to cover, if you only read a 2-3 chapters at a time, and bear in mind that all the jokes will be similar, you can have a lot of fun with this book. If you neglect any of that, it can get tiresome. Once I figured that out (it didn’t take long, thankfully, before I recognized the symptoms), I had a lot of fun with this book.

The illustrations are wonderful—each chapter (except the Pynchon chapter) features a great caricature of the artist, and a handful of other illustrations that do a wonderful job of augmenting the text.

This is not the subtlest of books I’ll read this year (it doesn’t try), but it is insightful, amusing and (accidentally?) informative. All of which makes it a fun, book-nerdy, read. Give it a shot, you’ll probably be glad you did.


3 Stars

This post contains an affiliate link. If you purchase from it, I will get a small commission at no additional cost to you. As always, opinions are my own.

Reread Project: The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction by Alan Jacobs: A very different model of what reading can be all about.

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction

by Alan Jacobs

Hardcover, 150 pg.
Oxford University Press, 2011

Read: January 2-3, 2020
Grab a copy from your local indie bookstore!

Read would give you delight—at least most of the time—and do so without shame. And even if you are that rare sort of person who is delighted chiefly by what some people call Great Books, don’t make them your study intellectual diet, any more than eat at the most elegant of restaurants every day. It would be too much. Great books are great in part because of what they ask of their readers: they are not readily encountered, easily accessed. The poet W. H. Auden once wrote, “When one thinks of the attention that a great poem demands, there’s something frivolous about the notion of spending every day with one. Masterpieces should be kept for High Holidays of the Spirit”—for our own personal Christmases and Easters, not for any old Wednesday.

I picked this up as my first book of the year as a way to refresh the mind, come into the year with a reminder of what kind of reader I want to be. As I write this, I’m deliberately not looking at what I wrote last time I read this, but you may find it interesting. Maybe not. I don’t know if I’ll end up repeating myself.

I remember this book being as close to a mission statement for my approach to reading as you could hope for—particularly because I came to it late in life. It’s not like this is a book I read in college and it shaped me/my thinking, but it’s something that I came to a couple of years ago and it was as if a more erudite and thoughtful version of myself had written it.

The beginning of the book is the heart of it, he sets forth his central theses, core argument:

one dominant, overarching, nearly definitive principle for reading: Read at Whim.

Reading shouldn’t be about self-improvement (primarily), it isn’t the mental equivalent of eating Brussels Sprouts. It should be for pleasure. And to maximize that, Jacobs will argue—read at whim.

Following that, Jacobs talks about many aspects of reading for pleasure—note-taking, thinking about what we read, focus (and how to expand it), the role of ereaders (he’s surprisingly pro-ereader), fighting distractions, evaluating what we read and more.

I was particularly struck this time through by his section on re-reading. For growing in appreciation for, or understanding of a work. Or because you enjoy escaping into a well-known and beloved world for a period.

Jacobs frequently quotes Auden, at one point he cites Auden’s five ratings for a book—I think we should maybe replace the standard 5-Star system with this:

For an adult reader, the possible verdicts are five: I can see this is good and I like it; I can see this is good but I don’t like it; I can see this is good, and, though at present I don’t like it, I believe with perseverance I should come to like it; I can see that this is trash but I like it; I can see that this is trash and I don’t like it.

Most of all, this is a celebration of/appreciation of reading. Jacobs is a kindred spirit to us readers as well as a humanities professor. Reading is both a passion and a profession—and both (particularly the former) are clearly seen in these pages.

Our goal as adults is not to love all books alike, or as few as possible, but rather to love as widely and as well as our limited selves will allow.

Hear, hear. That’s a good reminder.


5 Stars

This post contains an affiliate link. If you purchase from it, I will get a small commission at no additional cost to you. As always, opinions are my own.

Clearing the Deck: Tweet-length thoughts about books I can’t find time to write about

Yeah, I have a daunting TBR stack, but I also have too many books on my “Too Write About” pile, and it’s bugging me. So, I’m cutting myself some slack, and am clearing the deck of everything from 2019 and before that I haven’t made time for. This was painful to do, I was looking forward to writing about most of these, but I’m just not going to get to them–and the 2020 books are starting to pile up, too. So, in 144 characters or less, here’s me cutting myself some slack.

(Click on the cover for an official site with more info)

Rivers of London: Detective Stories
3.5 Stars
Rivers of London, Volume 4: Detective Stories by Andrew Cartmel, Ben Aaronovitch, Lee Sullivan
Brief flashbacks showing what Peter et al. get up to between novels/comic series. A fun idea, well executed. Would enjoy another one like this.
Cry Fox
3.5 Stars
Rivers of London Volume 5: Cry Fox by Andrew Cartmel, Ben Aaronovitch, Lee Sullivan
This was a lot of fun, and showed a new side of a cool recurring character.
Rivers of London: Action At A Distance
3 Stars
Rivers of London: Action At A Distance by Andrew Cartmel, Ben Aaronovitch, Brian Williamson, Stefani Renne
A serial killer hunt and Nightingale backstory. Great combo.

(some nice Molly material, too)

Geerhardus Vos: Reformed Biblical Theologian, Confessional Presbyterian
4 Stars
Geerhardus Vos: Reformed Biblical Theologian, Confessional Presbyterian by Danny E. Olinger
A biography and a discussion of his Vos’ major works. This was an excellent way to gear up for my 2019 Vos reading. Inspirational stuff.
The Utterly Uninteresting and Unadventurous Tales of Fred, the Vampire Accountant
3 Stars
The Utterly Uninteresting and Unadventurous Tales of Fred, the Vampire Accountant by Drew Hayes, Kirby Heyborne (Narrator)
A light Urban Fantasy about misfit monsters. Enjoyable enough to come back for more.
Open Season
4 Stars
Open Season by C. J. Box, David Chandler (Narrator)
Series Debut about a WY Game Warden with a nose for mystery. Loved the dual POVs (Pickett, his daughter). Addicting.
Please Don't Tell My Parents I'm a Supervillain
3 Stars
Please Don’t Tell My Parents I’m a Supervillain by Richard Roberts, Emily Woo Zeller (Narrator)
A cute story about kids of super-heroes/super-villains trying to get started in the biz without their parents’ involvement. Went on longer than it needed to, but fun enough to try volume 2.
Dragon Blood
3 Stars
Dragon Bones by Patricia Briggs, Joe Manganiello (Narrator)
Manganiello is a great choice for narrator. Nice little stand-alone fantasy story. Great dragons.
Savage Run
3.5 Stars
Savage Run by C. J. Box, David Chandler (Narrator)
Almost as good as the first Pickett novel. Mrs. Pickett gets to shine here, too. I’m so glad I finally got to this series.
Inkheart
3 Stars
Inkheart by Cornelia Funke, Lynn Redgrave (Narrator)
Gets a bit redundant, but I loved the concept. Better than the movie (which I kind of liked), but still could’ve been better.
Undeath and Taxes
3 Stars
Undeath and Taxes by Drew Hayes, Kirby Heyborne (Narrator)
A little better than the first volume, an enjoyable way to spend a few hours.
Dragon Bones
3 Stars
Dragon Blood by Patricia Briggs, Joe Manganiello (Narrator)
OK, so Dragon Bones wasn’t a stand-alone. Could’ve been, but it was nice to get a little more with these characters/this world. Still, give me a Briggs Urban Fantasy above this.
The Imputation of the Active Obedience of Christ in the Westminster Standards
4 Stars
The Imputation of the Active Obedience of Christ in the Westminster Standards by Alan D. Strange
I love this series. Strange packs so much material into this tiny package. Excellent stuff.
Badlands
3 Stars
Badlands by C. J. Box, January LaVoy (Narrator)
Cassie takes over The Highway series and moves to a new Oil Town in North Dakota. Midwest Winter, Drugs, Murder, Corruption and Too Much Money wreak havoc on her first week on the job.
Zombie Spaceship Wasteland (Audiobook)
3.5 Stars
Zombie Spaceship Wasteland: A Book by Patton Oswalt (Audiobook)
The memoir chapters are nice, the comedic bits are odd (and funny). An interesting look at Oswalt.
No Sweat
3 Stars
No Sweat: How the Simple Science of Motivation Can Bring You a Lifetime of Fitness by Michelle Segar, Ph.D.
A great way to look at keeping (or getting) yourself motivated to exercise.